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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
hey guys i've had these pictures for a while but finally getting around to putting them up for you guys to see. this is the CVtech primary, along with the machined secondary setup that will make your commanders run like a scaled ape.the CVtech uses a smaller diameter one-way bearing allowing the belt to drop lower in the primary, and higher in the secondary giving you more low end or a lower initial start-off gear ratio. once you get rolling you will notice the crisp midrange and awesome acceleration due to the clutches simplicity, few moving parts, and light weight. this clutch weighs almost 3 lbs less than the stocker. this allows the engine to rev lots faster and build RPMS under load faster. this clutch also is almost a full 1/2" larger diameter than the stock clutch, giving you TONS more gear. i have had multiple commanders run 55-58mph in LOW RANGE! this clutch gives you the ability to run 90-91mph in high range, but the ECU is limited to 75mph. the awesome low end, and better throttle response is an instant hit with everyone, and the fact that this clutch does NOT smoke the belts like the stock clutch is the icing on the cake!

CVtech clutch, and how it is assembled








NOTE: the weights go inside the clutch






NOTE: the hex of the fixed plate will rest and fit inside the hex of the shaft then the nut will lock it all down.











NOTE: there is a yellow centering washer that goes inside the end of the clutch. the stock washers stay on the factory bolt and the centering washer lines the bolt up in the end of the clutch







the stock secondary and CVtech primary machined together.








upgraded sliders for the fixed plate (depending on horsepower levels) some engines with more power than stock will need the upgraded sliders. when you give me the build list of your machine including all the engine performance adders and bolt-ons, i can determine what power levels your machine will put out, and build you a clutch to suit your needs. for high performance machines you will need the upgraded sliders as the stock sliders will not handle the high performance of lots of bolt ons and racing. the upgrades i have will, as i have had great success with all the upgrades i offer.

delrin sliders on the left stock on the right. (meets mild builds 70-80hp)






stock sliders at top, aluminum in the middle, and titanium at the bottom
aluminum for high performance, racing applications, up to 110hp. titanium for everybody wanting the best of the best! i cant break them and i've had them on some serious machines! already laid down over 190ft/lbs of torque on a turbo'd 1000 with the titanium sliders and no problems!



 

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Thanks for the pics Adam. Being that the Commander is 85hp stock, do you recommend we start off with the aluminum sliders? I've read on the Outlander forums that the some guys were having problems with the sliders breaking. Don't remember which sliders they had or if they were running modified engines. How much is the upgraded sliders? Thanks.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
i am referring to wheel horsepower. the crank horsepower is so hard to actually gauge. the commanders will only likely make 60wheel horsepower. the stock sliders are pushing it for someone who plans to really ride their machine hard. i would honestly reccomend the delrin sliders for every owner because they seem to hold up so much better. the reason the sliders break is because of the can-ams odd firing order. the engine has a dead spot in the firing order where the crank will roll over, and stop suddenly and then the next piston fires and jerks the crank back to turning again. this instant stop start is what is shearing the sliders on the clutch. a stock engine does not usually make the power to break the sliders. its usually only the high compression engines, where the stop start sequence is alot more violent. its hard to believe it, but the can-am engine is basically backfiring and kicking back at idle. very similar to how a single cylinder backfires and kicks back, this engine does it at idle, but somehow manages to keep itself running. on a high compression engine, this kickback is more violent, and shears the sliders inside the plate.

on a stock 800 engine i have seen as much as 59whp, and this owner runs the stock sliders with no problems. most of the big bore and high compression builds make in excess of 70whp. the least powerful of the bore setups being the 840, and it still makes 65+whp. i have only seen the 840 break the stock sliders in a 12.5-1+ compression setup. the BIG bores like 912, 916, 940, 960 i have seen all of them break the stock sliders, but all of those engines make 75+whp. only 1 bike has ever broken the delrin sliders, and he was making 80hp and running a 30shot of nitrous with huge mud tires pit racing. other than that one bike, nobody has ever broken the delrin sliders and i have them all the way up to 90whp builds. from there on above i recommend the aluminum sliders. if you want to make more than 110whp consistently give me a call. i have something even better!
 

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Thanx for posting Adam....can't wait to see those pics on a real computer instead of Droid......you'll be seeing one ship to us soon.......

BTW, please post over here from the CanAm Forum the super moderator that has run the STM Rage 8, then his rants of yours.....that impressed me!.......he did a down and dirty comparison and liked the CVTech better.....Lance
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
this clutch is made very similar to the powerbloc, it is called the trailbloc and is rated to easily handle the power the can-am produces, the only issue is the way the can-am fires so that is why i had to build the sliders. the clutch will hold the power without any doubt. the spring controls the engagement, this clutch uses a dual rate primary spring meaning it has two completely different rates. the first rate is simply for engagement, the second is to control shiftout. i have multiple springs in stock and can give you a 1900-2000 engagement (stall) or a 2400-2500 stall, or a 2900-3000 stall depenging on how you run the machine. if you are strictly racing and want the higher engagement for hard launches i can easily put that spring in for you. if you want a mild setup i can do the 1400 engagement for super hard launches when you stall the machine up, but still have superb subtlety when you are trail riding, or for the ones who want a stock smooth engagement that is smooth as butter i can do the low 2000 stall so your machine is moving the instant you give it 1% of throttle.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
yessir the weight slugs inside the slider block are the actual weights of the clutch. they effect the shiftout of the clutch, not the engagement RPMs. the engagement RPMs are changed by the spring in the primary. the shiftout RPMs are controlled by the weights in the clutch
 
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